By Sarah C. Threnhauser

When executives of provider organization discuss the importance of services that help people remain in the community and out of the hospital, programs like home- and community-based services (HCBS), more times than not the conversation hinges on one critical matter – housing. The reason is clear. People with housing insecurity are simply much more likely to use significant amounts of health care resources, often in frequent hospitalizations (see The Blending & Braiding Of Housing & Health Care Funding). In these cases, people are not benefiting from coordinated . . .
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When executives of provider organization discuss the importance of services that help people remain in the community and out of the hospital, programs like home- and community-based services (HCBS), more times than not the conversation hinges on one critical matter – housing. The reason is clear. People with housing insecurity are simply much more likely to use significant amounts of health care resources, often in frequent hospitalizations (see The Blending & Braiding Of Housing & Health Care Funding). In these cases, people are not benefiting from coordinated . . .
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